The Coffee Bean Journey:

Hand roasted artisan coffee

 

Grown in a Sustainable Enviroment
Picked by Local Farmers
Inspected
Packed
Shipped to UK
Roasting
Grind to Brew Style
Packed by Volume
Delivery
Brew coffee
Perfect Cup of Coffee

We remove the commodity brokers, large corporations of sale and distributors; instead we

go straight to the source. Our coffee beans come direct from the farmers or their identified

wholesalers (unlike our competitors we are transparent when it comes to our sourcing

strategy).

portafiler icon, espresso icon, espresso machine icon, coffee icon
Espresso

Fine grind for a portafilter; Dark roast for that full flavour.

stove pot, stove icon, stove pot icon, coffee stove pot icon, stove pot vector
STOVE

Fine grind; Medium or Dark roast for to keep that desired strong espresso taste.

aeropress icon, aeropress vector
Aeropress

Medium to course grind; Medium roast recommended.

cafeteria icon, cafeteria vector, french press icon, french press vector
Cafetiere

Course grind; Medium roast to allow for that steeping time and full body.

drip coffee, drip coffee icon, filter coffee, filter paper for coffee, coffee filter
Drip

Fine to Medium grind; Medium roast, so allowing the coffee to infuse with the hot water as it passes through the filter.

portafiler icon, espresso icon, espresso machine icon, coffee icon
Espresso

A fine, consistent grind for portafilter use, typically dark roasted for maximum strength and flavour.

stove pot, stove icon, stove pot icon, coffee stove pot icon, stove pot vector
STOVE

Most people see these stoves pots and think of the classical Italian means of brewing coffee. The stove pot creates its own vacuum, which produces shots of espresso that some say taste as good as a portafilter pressurised coffee machine, but at a fraction of the cost. A fine, consistent grind is required for a maximum strength and full flavour espresso shot.

aeropress icon, aeropress vector
Aeropress

A compact device adopted by the regular travellers. Allows them to take coffee abroad and maintain their personal coffee standards. The device allows for the user to select their own grind to suit their taste.

cafeteria icon, cafeteria vector, french press icon, french press vector
Cafetiere

Are a common feature in most households these days, requiring a course grind to avoid the grinds getting caught in the mess filter or passing through it. Steeping time is key to ensuring the flavour leaves the grind and settles in the hot water. Too long a steep and the flavour can be ruined.

drip coffee, drip coffee icon, filter coffee, filter paper for coffee, coffee filter
Drip

The innovation of this little dripper is in its unique designed cone dripping system. It has a large hole at the bottom funnelled by spiral ribs on the side. Grind to be fine to medium, to allow for the perfect brew. Mastering the technique may take some time, but once achieved, the taste is wonderful.

 

Roasting Profile

 

Basics – coffee beans are classed as a food, so when we roast the bean, we are in fact cooking the bean under the conventional understanding. The bean is therefore absorbing heat during its roast. Variables in the roasting will create a different roast profile. It is this profile that roasters work very hard to establish the perfect taste for their customers.

Theses variables are commonly understood to be:

  • Beans origin.
  • Green beans age.
  • Roasting time.
  • Roasting heat.
  • Oils released from the bean.
  • The roasters fuel source, gas or electrical (typically).
  • The roasters manufacturer – though this is subjective.

For those not in the industry, the most common way to interpret the roast of a bean is by its colour. Oils are released during the roasting process, which result in the bean becoming darker the longer it see’s heat. Its not a terribly accurate way to describe the roast, but it is convenient. Therefore the common roasts are known as Light, Medium and Dark.

 

green coffee bean, green coffee bean icon, green bean, wholesale green beans
green coffee bean, green coffee bean icon, green bean, wholesale green beans
Green Bean

Are a common feature in most households these days, requiring a course grind to avoid the grinds getting caught in the mesh filter or passing through it. Steeping time is key to ensuring the flavour leaves the grind and settles in the hot water. Too long a steep and the flavour can be ruined.

light roasted coffee bean, light roasted coffee bean icon, roasted coffee bean, roasted icon, roasted coffee icon, roasted coffee, light coffee
light roasted coffee bean, light roasted coffee bean icon, roasted coffee bean, roasted icon, roasted coffee icon, roasted coffee, light coffee
LIGHT

Light brown in colour, with light body of flavour, and no oil’s on the surface of the roasted bean. They will have a more pronounced acidity, but retain more of the origins flavours, and retain the highest caffeine content. Light roasted beans generally reach an internal temperature of 180°C – 205°C (356°F – 401°F). At or around 205°C, the beans pop or crack and expand in size. This is known as the “first crack”.

medium roasted coffee, medium roast coffee, fresh roast, medium coffee, medium roast coffee bean icon, coffee bean roasted
medium roasted coffee, medium roast coffee, fresh roast, medium coffee, medium roast coffee bean icon, coffee bean roasted
MEDIUM

As the name suggests, the roast is found to be a medium brown colour, and like the light roasts, no oil yet present on the surface of the beans. They lack the grainy taste of the origin beans found in lighter roasts, and the body of the coffee comes out, exhibiting a balanced flavour, aroma and acidity levels. Caffeine levels decrease slightly, but still more than found in dark roasts. Medium roasts reach internal temperatures between 210°C (410°F) and 220°C (428°F) — between the end of the first crack and just before the beginning of the second crack. The balanced flavour and aroma is why the medium roast is the one typically found in well-known coffee houses.

medium roasted coffee, medium roast coffee, fresh roast, medium coffee, medium roast coffee bean icon, coffee bean roasted
medium roasted coffee, medium roast coffee, fresh roast, medium coffee, medium roast coffee bean icon, coffee bean roasted
MEDIUM/DARK

A darker, richer colour over the medium roast, with the beginning of oil showing on the surface of the roasted beans. They have a fuller/heavy body and lower acidity. Caffeine levels are similar to that of the medium roast. The beans are roasted to the beginning or middle of the second crack, about 225°C (437°F) or 230°C (446°F). The flavours and aromas of the roasting process become noticeable, and the taste of the coffee may be somewhat spicy.

dark roasted coffee bean icon, dark roasted coffee, dark roast, coffee bean icon, coffee bean roasted, roasted coffee bean
dark roasted coffee bean icon, dark roasted coffee, dark roast, coffee bean icon, coffee bean roasted, roasted coffee bean
DARK

These beans will appear dark in colour, like chocolate. The oil has been released onto the outer layer of the bean, giving it a sheen. The origins flavours are typically eclipsed by the roasting process. The taste is typically described as bitter, smoky or some would say burnt. The caffeine content has at this stage been substantially reduced. Coffee beans are roasted to an internal temperature of 240°C (464°F) — about the end of the second crack — or beyond. They are seldom roasted to a temperature exceeding 250°C (482°F), at which point the body of the beans is thin and the taste is characterized by flavors of tar and charcoal. Dark roasts are used for espressos as people associate the bitterness with the espresso taste. It also has low levels of acidity, thus being kinder to the stomach during digestion.

dark roasted coffee bean icon, dark roasted coffee, dark roast, coffee bean icon, coffee bean roasted, roasted coffee bean
dark roasted coffee bean icon, dark roasted coffee, dark roast, coffee bean icon, coffee bean roasted, roasted coffee bean
EXTRA DARK

Stag Roasters don’t as yet provide this roast profile, as perceptions might be that the coffee has been “burnt”, when in fact it was its intended taste.

We at Stag Roasters are proud of our products, and want all of our customers to

experience these unique worldwide coffees. We therefore like to recommend a

particular good coffee from time to time. When you see our stamp on a coffee,

you know its been carefully and responsibly sourced for your enjoyment.